Ticks

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GIN51E
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Ticks

Post by GIN51E » 04 October 05 10:55 pm

Ok well the first ever Tick i got was in Wollongong when i was about 8 or something and i had never had one since until now in the past 4 weeks i've had 3 Ticks, one from Wollongong again, one from Lane Cove area and now one from Gosford, is it just me or is everyone else finding them alot more? and what is the best way of preventing yourself from getting them? just your normal Aeroguard?
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Although i'm happy i have never had a Leach however i've been with many people which have got them yet i managed to escape except Tonight after wondering out in the bush after work i found a Leach crawling along the bedroom floor, :shock:

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edmil
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Post by edmil » 04 October 05 11:05 pm

I hadn't really come across any leeches until I started Geocaching I still have a wopping great bruise from last weeks little effort And I know it was only a little bugger. The line of sight series gave the pesky little blighters a good taste and I think they've broadcast it across the state. Looks real good when you have the effects of a leech on the top of your head.

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hydroflare
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Post by hydroflare » 04 October 05 11:39 pm

There are plenty around, particularly after rain.
My son had over 50 on him after a recent cache hunt in Kuringai.
They are usually the tiny "grass ticks", about the size of a pinhead and almost impossible to see without a magnifying glass.
Pop a drop of 'Rid' on them and they die pretty quickly, then simply pull them out with tweezers.

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Chwiliwr
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Post by Chwiliwr » 05 October 05 12:17 am

In my opinion normal Aeroguard isn't enough to prevent ticks from attaching themselves to you and it has never worked well enough for me.

I now use Bushman Plus as it was recommended by a number of camping/bush walking people and is especially good for ticks and it claims to be good for leeches as well but as I don't go where leeches are so don't know about that part. I do Rogaining as a sport as well as geocaching and since starting to use Bushman Plus haven't seen any ticks on me.

Another way to avoid them attaching to you is to avoid animal trails and wear tight clothing but in our bush and in summer that isn't very practicable.

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Post by gingernutta » 05 October 05 12:19 am

I heard Frontline was pretty good for preventing ticks, and salt for getting rid of leeches - you drop it on them and they drop off.

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Richary
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Post by Richary » 05 October 05 2:42 pm

I have found Aerogard on the shoes tends to discourage the leeches from climbing up onto your legs. They don't seem to like the taste.

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Post by gingernutta » 05 October 05 11:25 pm

I've just arrived home from a (veterinarian) seminar which included reviewing the current advice on how to remove a tick. Apparently you just pull it out with tweezers. The current advice does not include turning it 3.5 times clockwise and then pulling, or applying anything (rid, hot match head etc), just tweeze and pull. If you expect them often enough there is such a thing as tick tweezers. :o

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VascoPyjama
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Post by VascoPyjama » 18 October 05 8:42 pm

The old rules that I was taught said that you never pull a tick or leech because you leave the head behind which might become infected. You have to convince them to leave of their own accord by using salt, alcohol, burning cigarette or whatever (please don't report me to the RSPCA). But I guess veterinarians know what they are doing.

Reminds me of my last tick infestation when I picked up about five on my upper back from a tree when I was pitching my tent at a caravan park. Just me, myself and I were present.

I obviously cut a dashing figure stripped to the waist with arms tangled like a green tree frog dabbing a rubbing alcohol soaked piece of toilet paper on my back while peering at myself in the amenities block mirror. I got a few strange looks and one little boy decided that he didn't need a jimmy riddle after all and left...quickly! :D

Is it a breach of etiquette to hand a total stranger a pair of tweasers and ask them to pull a tick for you?

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Post by Hounddog » 18 October 05 11:17 pm

The worst leeches I had were at either Strickland Stroll, or Lake View. In both cases it was the rain that brought them out in the hundreds. I had dozens on me, sucking my bloodstream dry. (or it seemed that way) I hate the buggers.

Ticks are bad too. Beware! especially if you take your dog into the bush. I am about to try the new stuff called Advanticks on my Geomut. Apparently this is the first medication of it's type that actually repels ticks. It's a pity there isn't something like that for humans too. :D

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GIN51E
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Post by GIN51E » 18 October 05 11:27 pm

Well according to the "Department of Medical Entomology" this is what they have to say,
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Tick Removal
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if a tick is detected that is attached, never attempt to place any chemical such as methylated spirits onto the tick, nor should it be touched or disturbed , as the tick will inject saliva into the skin, which could make the situation worse. Rather the tick Should be sprayed with an aerosol insect repellent preferably containing pyrethrin or a pyrethroid (if a repellent cannot be found which contains a pyrethroid, then Lyclear, a scabies cream containing permethrin will work fine). The Combination of hydrocarbons and the pyrethrin acts as a narcotic and a toxicant, and prevents the tick from injecting its saliva. The tick should be sprayed again one minute later (or dabbed with Lyclear) and left. After 24 hours it should drop off naturally or be gently removed with fine-tipped forceps. It is normal for a tick bite to remain slightly itchy for several weeks, however if other symptoms develop, then a doctor should be consulted immediately.
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Also note who this information is from and the quote listed below.
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Identification of ticks, and other medically important insects, is performed through the Medical Entomology Department at ICPMR, Westmead Hospital. The Medical Entomology Department is the only NATA accredited laboratory in Australia for the identification of arthropods of medical importance
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also "seed", "grass" "bush" ticks are all the same just at another stage of their life.
The various life stages of the paralysis tick, Ixodes holocyclus. The smallest stage, the larvae are also known as 'seed' or 'grass' ticks, while latter stages are often referred to as 'bush' ticks or 'shellbacks', but all of these terms refer to the same animal. The unengorged adult female is around 4mm long, the nymph around 2mm, while the larvae are less than 1mm.
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and as with most things its only the female that sucks blood.
<P> i got all of this from http://medent.usyd.edu.au/fact/ticks.htm
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yet the site doesn't seem to be working at this very moment. maybe later

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